Reforming the Incorporated Societies Act – Why are we still waiting?

New Zealand was among the first countries to legislate for the incorporation of many types of community organisations. However, we now lag behind other jurisdictions; notably the Australian States and Canadian Provinces. The archaic nature of the Incorporated Societies Act 1908, the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 and other statutes governing not-for-profit organisations has been discussed in previous articles in this series (in July and August 2011); namely Reforming the Not-For-Profit Statutes – Fundamental Questions, Reforming the Not-For-Profit Statutes – Constitutional Questions, Reforming the Not-For-Profit Statutes – Liquidation, Dissolution, Mergers and Transition, Reforming the Not-For-Profit Statutes – Legal Powers and Resolving Disputes, and Reforming the Not-For-Profit Statutes – Governance Questions (which are not going to be updated) , and those articles also discussed the Law Commission project into the adequacy of those Acts.  Now we are waiting for some legislative action!   The reform process Like all legislation, the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 can only be changed by Parliament. Our Law Commission was established to provide Parliament, the Government and the public with independent, expert advice on what are, almost invariably, what lawyers describe as “black letter” law issues; that is, law which is seldom politically controversial but which enables people to get on with their everyday lives. Such “black letter” law includes statutes like the Property Law Act, Land Transfer Act, Companies Act, Burial and Cremation Act, and the Trustee Act. The Minister of Justice’s 1 July 2010 reference to the Law Commission (seven years ago!) requested it to investigate the “uncomfortably old” Incorporated Societies Act 1908. About 12 months later, the Commission published an Issues Paper on reforming the...