The Quorum for Meetings

2011 Article, updated November 2017 There are often misunderstandings about the rules which apply to the quorum for a meeting (the minimum number of members that must be present at a meeting). General principles As it may be difficult to attract a majority of members to the meetings of some organisations, the quorum is commonly set at a fraction (less than half) of the membership, or at a fixed number of members. However, for an organisation’s executive committee it is common to find the quorum set at one more than half the number on the committee.  When a subcommittee is established the quorum will be all members of that subcommittee, unless a different quorum is prescribed in the rules or when the subcommittee is constituted.  While unusual, one person may be appointed as a committee or subcommittee if the wording of the relevant rules allows this (Re Taurine Co (1883) 25 Ch D 118 (CA), cited with approval in Green v Meltzer, Court of Appeal, CA153/92, 7 April 1993, by McKay J). A public meeting, of course, has no quorum. At any time during a meeting, any member or the meeting chairperson, may question whether a quorum is present. Such a “call for a quorum” takes precedence over all other business.  If there is no longer a quorum the meeting is said to be “inquorate” and unless absent members can be called back into the meeting it must be closed and the reason for the closure noted in the minutes. The Local Government Act 2002 and other statutes have special rules for statutory bodies, but for community organisations reference should...